• Phone: 613-336-0441
  • Address: 12278 Hwy 41 Northbrook, ON K0H 2G0
  • August 28, 2020
  • Cannabis
  • by Kathy Rasmussens

    Keeping it legal! The Ontario Government has laws designed to keep cannabis out of the hands of children and youth, keep our roads and highways safe and combat the illegal market.

    AGE

    AGE: You must be 19 and older to buy, use, possess and grow recreational cannabis.

    I.D.  You must show a valid photo ID to. The following forms of ID are acceptable:
    A Canadian Passport, Ontario Driver’s License with a photo of the person to whom the license is issued, a Canadian Citizenship Card, Canadian Armed Forces ID card, A photo LCBO card, a Secure Indian Status Card issued by the Government of Canada, a Permanent Residential Card issued by the Government of Canada, or a Photo Card issued under the Photo Card Act, 2008.

    QUANTITY

    How much cannabis can I possess?
    You are able to have a maximum of 30 grams (approx. one ounce) of dried cannabis (or equivalent) in public at any time.

    One gram of dried cannabis is equal (equivalent) to:

    • 5 grams of fresh cannabis
    • 15 grams of edible product
    • 70 grams of liquid product
    • 0.25 grams of concentrates (solid or liquid)
    • 1 cannabis plant seed

    How much Cannabis can I purchase?
    You may purchase up to 30 grams of Cannabis.

    WHERE IS OK?

    Where CAN I smoke and vape Cannabis?
    You CAN smoke or vape cannabis in:

    • Private residences
    • Many outdoor public places
    • Designated smoking guest rooms in hotels, motels and inns
    • Residential vehicles and boats that meet certain criteria (for example, if they have permanent sleeping accommodations and cooking facilities, and are parked or anchored). Learn more about the rules for cannabis and driving.
    • Scientific research and testing facilities (if the cannabis use is for scientific research and testing purposes)
    • Controlled areas in:
      • long-term care homes
      • certain retirement homes
      • residential hospices
      • provincially-funded supportive housing
      • designated psychiatric facilities or veterans’ facilities

    Additional restrictions on smoking and vaping may exist in municipal bylaws, lease agreements and the policies of employers and property owners.

    WHERE IS NOT OK?

    Where CAN’T I smoke and vape Cannabis?
    You CANNOT smoke or vape cannabis in:

    • indoor common areas in condos, apartment buildings and university/college residences
    • enclosed public places and enclosed work places
    • non-designated guest rooms in hotels, motels and inns
    • at school, on school grounds, and all public areas within 20 metres of these grounds
    • on children’s playgrounds and public areas within 20 metres of playgrounds
    • in child care centres or where an early years program is provided
    • in places where home child care is provided — even if children aren’t present
    • within 9 metres from the entrance or exit of hospitals (public and private), psychiatric facilities, long-term care homes, independent health facilities
    • on outdoor grounds of hospitals (public and private) and psychiatric facilities
    • in non-controlled areas in long-term care homes, certain retirement homes, provincially-funded supportive housing, designated psychiatric or veterans’ facilities, and residential hospices
    • Publicly owned spaces: You cannot smoke or vape cannabis in publicly-owned sport fields (not including golf courses), nearby spectator areas and public areas within 20 metres of these areas.
    • Vehicles and boats: You cannot consume cannabis (smoking, vaping and eating) in a vehicle or boat that is being driven or will be driven.
    • Learn more about the rules for cannabis and driving.
    • Other outdoor areas: You cannot smoke or vape cannabis:
    • in restaurants and on bar patios and public areas within 9 metres of a patio
    • on outdoor grounds of specified Ontario government office buildings
    • in reserved seating areas at outdoor sports and entertainment locations
    • on grounds of community recreational facilities and public areas within 20 metres of those grounds
    • in sheltered outdoor areas with a roof and more than two walls which the public or employees frequent, or are invited to (for example, a bus shelter)

    GROWING

    What are the laws: Growing your own cannabis?

    • You may grow up to four cannabis plants per residence (not per person) if:
      • you are 19 years of age and older
      • it is only for your personal use
      • the starting material was purchased from the Ontario Cannabis Store or an authorized retail store
      • it is not forbidden by your lease agreement or condo rules

    EDIBLES

    What are the laws: Cannabis Edibles?

    • Cannabis edibles are legal in Canada as of October 17, 2019.Edible cannabis products are allowed to have:
      • up to 10 milligrams of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) in a single package
      • up to 30 milligrams of caffeine, if it is naturally occurring (for example, in chocolate, coffee and tea)

      Edible cannabis products must contain no nicotine or added alcohol.

    EXTRACTS & TOPICALS

    What are the laws: Extracts and Topicals?

    • Extracts and topicals are legal in Canada as of October 17, 2019.Extracts (also known as concentrates) that are inhaled or ingested, and topicals (cannabis-infused products for skin, hair and nails) can have up to 1,000 milligrams of THC per package.Products are prohibited from:
      • being appealing to youth
      • making health, dietary or cosmetic claims (for example, low fat or suitable for joint pain)
      • having elements that associate the product with alcoholic beverages, tobacco products or vaping products

    WORKPLACE RULES

    What are the laws: Rules for the Workplace?

    Consuming recreational cannabis in an enclosed workplace remains illegal after legalization on October 17, 2018.

    Employers (and supervisors)

    • need to know the rules for medical cannabis
    • are required to address workplace hazards, under the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA)

    Employees and workers:

    • who are unable or unfit to work safely could be a hazard to themselves or to others in the workplace
    • have a duty to perform work safely and to report any hazards to their supervisor or employer under the OHSA

    See additional rules related to cannabis use in the workplace, including for commercial drivingwhere you can use recreational cannabis and using medical cannabis in the workplace.

    Source: Ontario Government Cannabis Laws Ontario.ca

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